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Lady Manners School

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Reports and Tracking

During the school year we send regular information about your child's progress:

  • Annual Report: a full report, usually distributed during the Summer Term (although the timing does vary between year groups)
  • Tracking Summary Reports: two brief reports of your child's progress are usually distributed, one in the Autumn and one in the Spring Term (again, timing does vary between year groups)

Reports can include the following information:

Years 7 - 11

End of Year 11 GCSE Targets

The end of Year 11 GCSE targets are the GCSE or equivalent grades that we think that your son or daughter should be aiming to achieve by the end of Year 11. They are broadly based on a nationally projected rate of progress from Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 4 and should be seen as a realistic challenge to aim for or exceed. For English and mathematics the target will relate to the standardised score achieved by the student in that subject at Key Stage 2. In other subjects, the target will be based on the average Key Stage 2 score for reading and mathematics.

As in all target-setting, expected outcomes are strongly determined by prior attainment. So a student who achieves a higher score at KS2 can be expected to achieve a higher GCSE grade than a student with lower KS2 attainment. However, we would expect students to make a similar amount of progress from their given starting point. Recording a progress towards the target will allow for all students to be treated equally in this respect. The target may be adjusted at the end of the academic year dependent on the progress made throughout that year.

The GCSE target will be based on the new GCSE grading scale of 1 to 9. A letter/number grade comparison of the new and old GCSE systems is shown below:

Grading New GCSEs from 2017
Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

Any estimate of expected progress cannot take account of a student's attitude to study and determination to succeed; nor is parental support considered. Both are major factors in achieving success at school. We are keen that students do not see the target as a limiting factor and, instead, take on the challenge of trying to exceed the target through hard work and a positive attitude to their class and homework, and by responding to feedback.

Lastly, a word of caution: given the new GCSEs and changes at Key Stage 2 we are working on very limited information. Also, we do not know how national grading methods may change.

Progress Towards GCSE Targets

This is a summary of the student's current progress towards the GCSE target, expressed as a number code from 1 to 4 as follows:

  1. Current progress is outstanding and indicates that the student is likely to exceed the GCSE target by one or more grades.
  2. Current progress is good and indicates that the student is ‘on track’ to achieve the GCSE target.
  3. Current progress indicates that the student is likely to achieve below the GCSE target by one grade.
  4. Current progress is weak and indicates that the student is likely to achieve below the GCSE target by two or more grades.
Attitude to Learning Grades (Classwork and Homework)

These are given for classwork and homework in the form of a number from 1 to 4. The same codes and descriptions apply to both Classwork and Homework.

1. An outstanding attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • acquiring knowledge, developing understanding and learning skills exceptionally well. 
  • showing excellent concentration and tackling challenging activities independently. 
  • being very keen to succeed.

2. A good attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • acquiring knowledge, developing understanding and learning skills well.
  • working at a good pace, and usually approaching challenging activities with enthusiasm and interest.
  • usually being keen to succeed.

3. A satisfactory attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • usually acquiring knowledge, developing understanding and learning skills quite well.
  • usually working effectively when given plenty of guidance but lacking confidence to improve the quality of work.
  • generally working steadily and sometimes showing enthusiasm and interest. Sometimes being keen to succeed.

4. An unsatisfactory attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • not acquiring knowledge, developing understanding or learning skills as well as expected. 
  • not usually working effectively without close direction and giving up easily, leading to poor task completion.
  • rarely showing enthusiasm and interest. Rarely being keen to succeed.
  • Concern codes are used to highlight specific problems in this 'unsatisfactory' grade:
    • 4b: behaviour
    • 4c: classwork
    • 4h: homework
Additional information

A range of further information covering attendance, rewards and behaviour referrals is included. We have an attendance target of 95%, and stress that good attendance is a key requisite for success. The figure indicated will represent any unexplained absence. The usual reason why this unauthorised absence appears is because we have not yet received a parental note about it: this is far more usual than actual truancy.

Please help us to reduce this figure by asking your son or daughter to check with their Form Tutor for any outstanding absence notes and send one in to us if this has yet to happen.

Years 12-13

A Level (ALPS) Target Grade

This is the A level grade that, according to a nationally accepted rate of progress, the student is expected to achieve at the end of their Sixth Form studies. It is based on their average GCSE score and does not take into account the student's attitude to learning or actual rate of progress in the Sixth Form.

Predicted A Level Grade

A prediction is given for the student's expected A level grade at the end of the Sixth Form. These predictions are based on the current student performance.

Attitude to Learning Grades (Classwork and Homework)

These are given for classwork and homework in the form of a number from 1 to 4. The same codes and descriptions apply to both Classwork and Homework.

1. An outstanding attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • acquiring knowledge, developing understanding and learning skills exceptionally well. 
  • showing excellent concentration and tackling challenging activities independently. 
  • being very keen to succeed.

2. A good attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • acquiring knowledge, developing understanding and learning skills well.
  • working at a good pace, and usually approaching challenging activities with enthusiasm and interest.
  • usually being keen to succeed.

3. A satisfactory attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • usually acquiring knowledge, developing understanding and learning skills quite well.
  • usually working effectively when given plenty of guidance but lacking confidence to improve the quality of work.
  • generally working steadily and sometimes showing enthusiasm and interest. Sometimes being keen to succeed.

4. An unsatisfactory attitude to learning is demonstrated through:

  • not acquiring knowledge, developing understanding or learning skills as well as expected. 
  • not usually working effectively without close direction and giving up easily, leading to poor task completion.
  • rarely showing enthusiasm and interest. Rarely being keen to succeed.
  • Concern codes are used to highlight specific problems in this 'unsatisfactory' grade:
    • 4b: behaviour
    • 4c: classwork
    • 4h: homework
ALPS Profile

The ALPS profile is based on national data, and is broadly the expected set of grades for a student to attain in the top quartile as compared with all students who achieved a similar GCSE average grade.

Additional information

Attendance information is included. Sixth Form students are reminded that they are expected to attend registration with their Form Tutor every morning. This is an important time for providing the advice, guidance and support that will help students achieve their potential.